"Reunion"



A review by Jenni:

What I love about this episode:
I love the house in this, especially the porch and the attic.

I like that this episode demonstrates how differently some people grieve.  Clarice was sad.  But Megan wanted to have a celebration.  Both are legitimate, I think, and acceptable ways to honor those we lost.  And get ourselves through the rest of life without them.

"Wade In the Water" is an awesome song.  After watching this I got the Alvin Ailey version off of iTunes.  Anyhow, it sounded lovely and stirring in this episode... until Monica joined in.  I did feel sorry for her there, though.

I watched two episode today and both have emotional scenes with dishes.  When Clarice begin to cry over the crystal bowl... that got to me.  It just made me think about how, after a loss, there's so much left to remind us of a person.  It also made me glad I have a crystal bowl. 

Clarice's reluctance to read Dottie's last letter also got to me.  It must be so painful to have something like that and know that, after that, you won't hear from your friend ever again until it's your own time to go Home.

 I like that Tess calls Clarice "sweet baby" when the latter breaks down.  Even though the two women look around the same age, it's a nice reminder of how ancient Tess truly is and how we're all babies in comparison.  I don't mind that feeling.  Rather like it, actually.

As bad as they may be, I get a kick outta Monica's goofy poems.

Ya gotta feel for Clarice.  She must have felt like her world was crumbling.  She lost her friend, she knew she'd lose Megan, and she was worried for her son.  I think Ms. Angelou's finest moment in this episode (other than, obviously, poetry readings) is when she explodes about this very thing.  It seems so real.

I'm proud of TBAA for having Sam tell his mother that he could marry Megan and have "safe sex, no sex."  They bring up sex so seldom that I guess I'm impressed whenever they do and handle it fairly and openly.

Tess' revelation to Clarice is a really lovely one.  First, I like the idea that Tess had been with Clarice at moments through out her life.  Kinda like a guardian angel lite.  And I love this line during that scene: "Maybe you don't want to give them your blessing but He does."  Just makes ya think about how many relationships God might bless that some people judge.

Another cool line from Tess: "There's nothing more dangerous than loving unless it's not loving."

I very much appreciate that Monica assures Megan that "God hasn't done this to you."  Cause I think a few too many people think HIV/AIDS is a punishment.  A little later Monica tells Megan "He will walk this road with you and He will be there for you when you reach the end of it."  I love that.

The reading of Maya Angelou's poem as Sam finds Megan in the cemetery is really poignant.  It's such a beautiful poem.

What I didn't love about this episode:
I actually feel really bad for Monica when Tess lambastes her over her poem during the seminar and then Clarice pretty much kicks her out.  I know it was meant to be funny and maybe it would have been with just the three of them in a room.  But with the other people there it just seemed mean.  It would have made me reluctant to speak up afterwards had I been there.

Lingering questions:
This episode brings up one of my favorite topics of late: to what extent is sacrifice acceptable in matters of love?  And when does one relent and allow someone to make a sacrifice for them even if it seems too big? 

Tess tells Sam that "Monica lights up like a Christmas tree" during her revelations whereas Tess described her own as not terribly exciting.  So does that mean angels determine their own "glow level"? 

Parts that made me feel swoony:
It's not fair that people bag on Andrew for not being super good at fixing cars when Monica gets to do it just with angel magic!

When Monica is sent off with Sam and Megan and she concludes "I've heard three's a crowd," I was kinda like "Huh..."  Maybe she really believes that and that's why she sometimes gives Andrew the shaft!

Random thoughts:
Whenever I watch this episode, I'm reminded of a controversy that erupted at my high school when Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings was required in Lit class.  Some parents refused to let their daughters read it (all girls school).  The school stuck to their guns and if you didn't read the book, down went your grade.  I was pretty proud of my school for that.  Censorship is not cool, especially by high school.  Also proud of my parents who were completely unfazed by what the head censor-happy parent said in a letter he wrote to all the other parents. 

I think it's awesome that Dottie stole a frog to keep it from getting dissected.  As a former frog mom (RIP Flick), I applaud her. 

I hope when I'm older I have a lifelong friend like Clarice and Dottie had.

I admire anyone who can read their own poetry aloud.  I'd be soooo nervous and probly couldn't do it.

I think Monica's head scarf looks really nice.  I wish I knew how to do that with my hair. 

A Word from Travis:
This is such a landmark episode for me as I wasnít both Ms. Maya Angelou and Ms. Natalie Cole also acted. This episode was phenomenal as all the actors. Ms. Martha Williamson revealed in the commentary for this episode, Ms. Cole had just recently found out that one of her friends had AIDS. I enjoy the scenery as well as the storyline; all the actors, from the big names (Maya Angelou, Natalie Cole) to the lesser known actors, all connected to make this episode one of my favorites. I donít like Tessí attitude towards Monica when she stood up and read her poetry. Your assertions about Tessí negative attitude is spot on. Tessí behavior in that scene was very rude and condescending and I wish that scene with was written differently. Tessí attitude wasnít at all funny if that was what the writers were hoping the audience to perceive.

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